Tag Archives: oshawa

Bitten By The Goalie Bug

20161105_144230Boy, do we love hidden sports talent stories! You know the ones, where a kid is put into a position he or she has never tried before, and pulls an amazing game from seemingly nowhere.

Meet Logan V. Last year he was brand new to hockey. As in, while many of his teammates had several years  under their belts and were as steady on their skates as they are in sneakers on dry pavement, Logan was quite literally making his brave debut with blades strapped to his feet in a competitive game.

Knowing how quickly kids pick up the sport, his coach and staff were pleased to help Logan work on his skills. Week after week, the parents of Team 1 watched as this young man worked hard to improve, and they cheered every game when he was able to break up a play, move the puck forward, or back up his teammates.

It’s always a great thing to see a player develop. But there is nothing more astonishing than to discover that a player has a hidden talent.

Logan’s hidden talent … is for goalie.

Here’s how it went. One day, Logan told his coach that he wanted to give the old net a try. So of course, his coach strapped him into the pads and sent him out for a practice to see how he liked it. Turns out he liked it well enough. His coach, together with Logan’s parents, watched anxiously as Logan went out there into net the very next game.

What happened next defies expectation. Shot after shot, Logan made the save. He was down, he was up … he was the Great Wall of Clarington! The parents of Team 1 gasped in amazement. Could this really be their Logan out there?!

The game ended in a win for Team 1, and no one could deny that Logan was player of the game!

Since that time, Logan has decided that he wants to be a full-time goalie, and is improving even further with his new coach on Team 3.

It just goes to show, friends, that even though kids progress at different rates, they each have different talents. And sometimes they have hidden talents, talents we didn’t even think to consider might be there.

We think everyone can agree – it is nothing short of amazing when they pull those talents out and surprise the “puck” out of us!

An On-Ice Slip: Not Always a Bad Thing

No matter how good a skater you are, no matter how many years you’ve been doing it, it’s inevitable – you’re going to fall at one time or another. And believe it or not, referees are not immune to this slightly embarrassing gaffe.

It’s a good thing our Clarington referees have a great sense of humour. Did you know that each time one of them has a wee slip on the ice, they contribute to a fund? A Fall Jar, if you will. They have a good laugh about it amongst themselves afterwards (so long as they’re not seriously hurt, of course), and they get back out there on the ice next game to do what they do best.

Now that’s dedication.

Normally, the Fall Jar fund goes towards an end-of-season celebration amongst our officials. A well-deserved one, may we say, considering the time and effort and, yes, bumps and bruises, that go hand-in-hand with a typical season.

But this year, the referees have decided to forgo their night out, and instead have donated the entire proceeds from their slips and trips.

This year, those proceeds sponsored a child in need.

That’s right! A kid who might otherwise not have been able to play hockey this year, got the chance to step out on the ice. They got the chance to be a part of a team, to make new friends, and to play the game that we all love.

Of course, our referees are modest. You would not have heard this story from them. But we’re not modest, and we’re perfectly happy to share this with our friends, players and parents. Our referees do far more for our kids than what we see on the ice every game. And they do it quietly, without expecting any kind of recognition in return.

So we hope you will all help us recognize our referees, and everything they do for us. Thank a ref next time you see one!

Photo Credit: Chris Waits

And The Most Dedicated Official Goes To …

We’re just going to say it: We’ve got the best people here in Clarington! Our parents, our players, our volunteers and especially our referees.

We are so proud to announce that, this summer, our very own senior official Dave Sankey has been awarded the prestigious Jack Clancy award for the most dedicated official in the 2015-2016 season.

… But of course, we always knew that about this outstanding gentleman!

daveDavid began his lifelong love for hockey when he started playing for Oshawa Minor Hockey at the age of 4. His dedication towards the sport only intensified from there; moving from Tyke all the way through to Midget, Dave developed his skills as a defenceman, eventually being playing for the Oshawa Legionaires Jr. B team when he was 16. It was at this time that Dave met his girlfriend – now wife of 28 years – Denise. Dave continued his hockey career, where at 17 he moved up from the Oshawa Legionaires to the Oshawa Generals

Dave became a referee for the Ontario Minor Hockey Association in 1993. He was hired by the Ontario Hockey Association three years later, in 1996 – doing his first Ontario University Athletics games in 1999. In 2006, after watching his daughters integrate into the hockey world, Dave made the decision to change things up and give women’s hockey a try; it was shortly after making this decision that he added refereeing for the Ontario Women’s Hockey Association to his already busy life.

Over the years, Dave has not only dedicated his free time to refereeing; he has also volunteered his time, coaching various hockey teams since 1987. In 1989 he was awarded Coach of the Year for his work with a midget A Little National Hockey League team. Dave has also coached various teams for all three of his daughters, both in house league and rep hockey for Clarington Girls Hockey Association. Dave’s enigmatic coaching style and knowledge of the game has gained his daughters midget BB team a provincial silver medal medal in 2009. Even after his daughters moved away from home, Dave continued to volunteer his coaching experience to a new generation of Clarington Girls, coaching atom and bantam aged teams, whom he had no familial connection to.

dave-2Dave continues to referee with gusto, and has no thoughts of slowing down any time soon, which is why he has been presented with the Ontario Hockey Association’s Jack Clancy Award, which is an award attained only by the most dedicated members of the hockey community.

Congratulations, Dave Sankey!

Scheduling Ice: A Look At What Our Board Members Do

Schedules. Waiting for the hockey schedule is like waiting to open birthday presents – a lot of excited hockey players are bouncing on their blades to find out when they play … Well, maybe that’s a bit of an exaggeration, but the posting of the schedule is pretty much the official kick-off to the season. And that’s something to look forward to, isn’t it?

Preparing the schedule is a lot harder than one might imagine. Just ask Paul Jefferson, one of our CRHL veterans. He’s been a member of the board of directors for more than thirteen years. His son has gone through the league as a player, and is now coaching one of his own teams. Yet Paul comes back year after year to volunteer his time to this fantastic organization, with no more motivation than the knowledge that “it’s for the kids.”

In the weeks leading up to the start of the season, Paul is busy at home matching up the teams and slotting them in for the entire year. “I end up putting in a lot of my free time,” he admits. “It’s gotten better over the years because I get better at it each time. You know, you get quicker, and you know what to look for. But still, it’s a real time commitment.”

There are many factors that go into building a schedule that people may not realize. For one, the Clarington Recreational Hockey League is just one of several organizations vying for the same ice time. Figure skating, power skating, speed skating, public skating, rep hockey, adult leagues, tournaments – everyone wants ice. With only so much rink space to go around, the municipality has to portion out the region’s limited facilities so that everyone gets what they need. This makes scheduling difficult for Paul, who has a finite portion of ice to work with for all of CRHL’s divisions and teams. And to ensure that teams are given the opportunity to book outside tournaments throughout the season, the schedule for the entire year has to be done at the start to allow players, coaches and parents to manager their own  commitments.

It may also surprise you to learn that Paul regularly goes to battle with the city about whether to give ice back or not … of course, we’re teasing when we say that. Understandably, the municipality does not want organizations keeping ice it doesn’t need, and is anxious to know how much ice time has been returned so that it can be redistributed. It’s Paul’s job to make sure he holds onto ice time for as long as he can (within reason) to ensure that only the right amount of ice, if any, is given back. It’s also Paul’s job to answer to the municipality when they want hard figures that he’s not yet ready to give. That’s a big ask of any volunteer, but he does it because, as he says, “It’s for the good of the league. When our credo is ‘every kid gets to play,’ we need to make sure we have the ice. We do it for the kids, first.”

At least some things remain constant. Paul is used to working with Orono and Newcastle, who are separate organizations that schedule their own practices and games, and has become accustomed to merging multiple schedules into one. Also, the younger divisions will never be on the ice in the later time slots, so he knows to work the older divisions into those spaces first to open up as many age-appropriate ones as possible. With these and other consistent factors, Paul has built up quite a refined process for putting the schedules together. Of note, it’s a process that has taken years to develop.

At the end of it all, Paul is confident in the schedules he builds. “I do make mistakes,” he admits. “Sometimes you get it done, and you don’t realize a team is missing a practice. So there is that element of human error. But if I know something’s wrong, I’ll fix it. At the end of the day I have to accept that you can’t make everyone happy, but I always aim to make as many people happy as possible.”

Paul
Paul Jefferson, Ice Scheduler, CRHL

Paul Jefferson is just one of the many dedicated volunteers at the Clarington Recreational Hockey League spending their free time to open up opportunities like local hockey for our kids. Thanks, Paul, for all you do to make sure our kids can play.